AAAS and the Foundation for Polish Science Announce Plans for New Award

 

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An agreement to establish a new Polish-American Scientific Award was signed by Professor Maciej ?ylicz, president of the Foundation for Polish Science (at right), and AAAS Chief Executive Officer Alan I. Leshner, executive publisher of the journal Science. [Credit: Michal Pietras]

AAAS and the Foundation for Polish Science on 28 May announced plans to launch a new award honoring scientists “who have made exceptional research achievements as a result of Polish-American scientific cooperation.”

 

An agreement to establish the Polish-American Scientific Award was signed by Professor Maciej ?ylicz, president of the Foundation for Polish Science (FNP), and AAAS Chief Executive Officer Alan I. Leshner, executive publisher of the journal Science.

The award’s nomination and selection process will be jointly conducted by AAAS and the FNP, and a ceremony honoring the winners will take place alternately in Poland and the United States.

“There has been a long history of U.S. and Polish scientists cooperating at the forefront of many disciplines, and this new award recognizes those historical connections,” said AAAS Chief International Officer Vaughan Turekian, director of the association’s Center for Science Diplomacy. “As we move forward, the initiative will help us to identify areas where international research cooperation can both advance science and build closer societal relationships.”

In Poland, “programs providing opportunities for academic and scientific exchange, both transatlantic and within Europe, are stronger than ever,” according to a 2012 AAAS Science & Diplomacy article by Marek Konarzewski and Gra?yna ?ebrowska, who handle Science & Technology Affairs for the Washington, D.C.-based Embassy of the Republic of Poland. “Every year, some 1.5 million European students and scholars visit partner institutions across the EU and the United States,” they reported.

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Scientists in Belarus and Poland have worked together, despite political strains, to protect the European bison in the Bialowieza Primeval Forest, which straddles the border between the two countries. [Credit: Karol Zub]

The AAAS International Office has established a range of partnerships to help promote scientific cooperation in various regions worldwide, from China and Europe to Africa.

The birthplace of Madam Maria Sklodowska-Curie—a chemist, physicist, and the first woman to receive a Nobel Prize in physics for her studies of radiation—Poland possesses scientific strengths ranging from advances in opto-electronics, to efforts to protect and conserve threatened species such as the European bison, and much more. In particular, a 2013 report by the European Commission found that Poland’s primary scientific strengths encompass food, agriculture and fisheries; energy; the environment; information and communication technologies; and certain areas of materials science.