Annual Meeting

Annual Meeting

139 Related Result(s)

  • E-cigarettes have only been on the market for about a decade, so scientists know little about their long-term effects. | Smoke-Fall by Sodanie Chea / CC BY 2.0 SAN JOSE, California — Science has firmly labeled tobacco products hazardous to human health, but the consequences of using e-cigarettes...
  • SAN JOSE, California — Improved imaging techniques are helping scientists spot brain injuries in the womb and map out the borderland between aging and Alzheimer's disease, researchers reported at the 2015 AAAS Annual Meeting . Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and techniques like...
  • Stanford computer scientist and Coursera co-founder Daphne Koller at the 2015 AAAS Annual Meeting | Atlantic Photography Boston SAN JOSE, California — Online learning is already bringing significant changes to education, but its biggest impact might be on the careers of people all over the globe,...
  • SAN JOSE, California — Until recently, when preparing to operate on patients' faces or heads, surgeons had to imagine how 2-D CAT scans stacked together to create 3-D skulls. Now, with 3-D imaging software, there's no imagination required, and that technology can help with everything from planning...
  • This page will be redirected to http://news.sciencemag.org/policy/2015/02/open-records-laws-becoming-vehicle-harassing-academic-researchers-report-warns
  • Three months after receiving an ABI, Angelica is learning to associate new sounds with their meanings through intensive therapy. | Keck Medicine of USC Cochlear implants have transformed hearing options for people born deaf or with severe hearing impairments, but they don't work for everyone. Now,...
  • AAAS President Gerald Fink at the 2015 AAAS Annual Meeting | Atlantic Photography Boston SAN JOSE, California — In the 1920s, biologists counted the number of human chromosomes by cutting up blurry microscopic images and pasting together potential chromosome pairs by size. The scientists came up...
  • SAN JOSE, California — They don't hold out much hope that Vulcans will arrive on our doorsteps intoning "live long and prosper," but many astronomers believe that making radio contact with an alien civilization would fundamentally alter humanity for the better. For fifty years, however, they have...