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Applied sciences and engineering/Computer science

Technology is not unbiased, according to a scholar investigating the phenomenon of technological racism. As people recognize the embedded biases within technology, the growing and multifaceted tech justice movement is working to counter these biases, added the scholar.

Merck/AAAS Undergraduate Science Research Program

Frequently Asked Questions


Eligibility

  1. Our institution awards more than 10 masters level degrees each year in Biology and Chemistry, are we still eligible to submit a proposal?
    If the average number of masters degrees awarded over a five year period exceeds 10 for biology and chemistry combined, then your institution does not meet the eligibility requirements.
      
  2. Our institution does not grant graduate degrees. Are we still eligible?
    Yes.
      
  3. My department does not have an ACS-approved chemistry program. however, I am confident that our program is as rigorous as any other institution's program. Can we still apply?
    No.
      
  4. Does the number of graduate degrees conferred annually include both Masters and PhDs?
    Yes.
      
  5. Does the absence of a formal Department of Biology preclude us from submitting?
    Yes.


Departmental Profiles

  1. In the application, there are tables for entering a profile for the chemistry and the biology departments. Since the “total undergraduate enrollment” is for the entire university, should this number be the same for each department?
    No. It is the number of declared majors within each department
      
  2. In the application, under the heading "full time regular faculty"do we include only tenure track faculty?
    You should include all full-time faculty members, whether they are tenure track or not.


Nature of Proposed Projects

  1. Does a project have to be co-sponsored by one biology professor and one chemistry professor? Or could a project be sponsored by one professor whose work is at the interdisciplinary edges of the two departments?
    A project can be sponsored by a single professor as long as the project is interdisciplinary.
      
  2. Do we need to have one all-encompassing project to which everyone involved contributes or can we propose separate projects that converge on a similar theme?
    Your proposal can be for multiple small projects or for a single large project. Just be sure they are realistic for the time available to execute and have results with undergraduates.
      
  3. Do the research projects need to be related to one another or can they be independent research projects?
    Either is acceptable. Be sure that they are reasonable projects to be performed with undergraduates.
      
  4. Can we include faculty from outside the biology and chemistry departments In our proposal such as computer science or math for a bioinformatics project?
    Yes, as long as both the biology and chemistry departments are involved.

If you have further questions or require additional information, contact the program representative at Merck@AAAS.org.

Deadline for Receipt: 5:00pm, Friday, 3 November 2006





  

At the AAAS EPI Center’s request, computer scientists and election experts met with Delaware’s State Election Commissioner Anthony Albence to discuss concerns related to the insecurity of the electronic systems being used for absentee voting.

As states grapple with the difficult task of holding elections during the COVID-19 pandemic, election administrators are exploring and implementing technology to deliver blank ballots electronically. The expansion of vote by mail in many states necessitates an option for voters with disabilities. These recommendations can help limit the security and privacy risks introduced with electronic blank ballot delivery and remote electronic ballot marking.

On May 13, 2020, AAAS Caribbean, Puerto Rican Minds in Action, the Puerto Rico Science Policy Action Network, Ciencia Puerto Rico, and the American Civil Liberties Union Puerto Rico held the Science and Public Policy Discussion: Implications and Risks of Internet Voting in the Puerto Rico Election Reform Act 2020.

All internet voting systems and technologies — including email and mobile voting apps — are currently inherently insecure. There is no technical evidence that any internet voting technology is safe or can be made so in the foreseeable future; all research to date demonstrates the opposite.

The nation’s leading experts in cybersecurity, computing, and science called on Governors, Secretaries of State and State Election Directors to refrain from allowing the use of any internet voting or voting app system in U.S. elections. An open letter prepared by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Center for Scientific Evidence in Public Issues and endorsed by leading organizations and experts in cybersecurity and computing highlights two decades of rigorous, science-based analysis which clearly demonstrates that internet voting is not a secure solution for voting in the U.S., nor will it be in the foreseeable future.

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