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Applied sciences and engineering/Engineering/Environmental engineering

Early in her career, Noelle Selin realized the need to be involved in both science and policy. As an associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Selin studies toxic air pollutants and how these emissions affect humans and the environment. In the policy arena, she is a member of the executive committee for the International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant, where she helps bring scientific evidence into public decision-making. She also hopes to convey to other scientists and to policymakers that interacting with stakeholders (such as the people affected by a policy or involved in its implementation) can build a broader base of support for a policy, and their perspectives can also make it easier to implement and more effective.
Early in her career, Noelle Selin realized the need to be involved in both science and policy. As an associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Selin studies toxic air pollutants and how these emissions affect humans and the environment. In the policy arena, she is a member of the executive committee for the International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant, where she helps bring scientific evidence into public decision-making. She also hopes to convey to other scientists and to policymakers that interacting with stakeholders (such as the people affected by a policy or involved in its implementation) can build a broader base of support for a policy, and their perspectives can also make it easier to implement and more effective.
Project looks at programs worldwide to glean insights and foster collaboration As the need for science in policymaking grows along with the complexity of challenges facing society, AAAS is issuing a report providing a panoramic view of programs that physically place scientists and engineers in the policy environment — mapping what works best to develop the personal relationships, trust and productive dialogue needed to bridge two very different worlds.
The nation’s leading scientific, engineering and academic organizations are calling on President Donald Trump to rescind the executive order on immigration and visas issued on 27 January, declaring it damaging to scientific progress, innovation and U.S. science and engineering capacity.