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Applied sciences and engineering/Engineering/Materials engineering


University of Ottawa chemistry student Steven Maquire explains time in his winning entry for the Flame Challenge. [Courtesy of Science Isn't Scary]

Alan Alda today announced the winners of Stony Brook University’s Flame Challenge contest, in which scientists had to explain “what is time?” in a way that would interest and enlighten 11-year-olds.

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Center for Advancing Science and Engineering Capacity
Daryl Chubin, Director
dchubin@aaas.org

Center for Careers in Science and Technology
Richard Weibl, Director
rweibl@aaas.org
202-326-6674

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Joe Immel, Ph.D., teacher of the Root Cause Analysis course at Technology High School. [Image courtesy of Karley Gomez Photography]

Nathan Klingbeil and his colleagues at Wright State University have found a way to double the graduation rate of engineering students. The key element is modifying how and when calculus is taught, so that it is not a barrier to learning but is in sync with how budding engineers solve problems.

An undergraduate course that allows students to build mathematical models of biological phenomena—and to experience a convergence of disciplines with potential in areas ranging from cancer treatment to reforestation—is the winner of the Science Prize for Inquiry-Based Instruction (IBI).