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Applied sciences and engineering/Engineering/Materials engineering

An undergraduate course that allows students to build mathematical models of biological phenomena—and to experience a convergence of disciplines with potential in areas ranging from cancer treatment to reforestation—is the winner of the Science Prize for Inquiry-Based Instruction (IBI).

Patricia Wallace, one of the people behind a Web site that connects, informs, and helps mentor gifted math and science students, sees the online resource as a way to nurture this country’s next generation of innovators.

Washington, D.C. public school libraries are getting much-needed books about science thanks to a book drive led by Subaru of America, Inc. and AAAS. An outgrowth of the AAAS/Subaru Science Books & Film Prizes for Excellence in Science Books, the book drive will donate as many as 1,250 books to local schools.

When MIT made a formal decision in the year 2000 to publish their course materials on the Internet, MIT alumni could have been miffed. Here was the institution’s renowned curriculum—previously accessible to students who paid for it with their tuition and hard-won academic achievement—being offered to anyone with a computer.

The executive director of the MIT OpenCourseWare program that manages publication of the curriculum, who herself is an alumna of MIT and the daughter of two more MIT graduates, says she and her former classmates were thrilled.

Local networks of experts can show communities how to bring more women and minorities to science and technology careers, according to a new report released by AAAS’s Center for Advancing Science & Engineering Capacity. It’s a strategy modeled after the well-known extension services approach pioneered by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, which link farmers to agricultural researchers.