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Applied sciences and engineering/Technology/Microtechnology/Microfluidics

The chip can help predict toxic effects of both common medications and drug candidates in rats, dogs and humans.

Researchers say the device can be reconfigured to test for a wide range of conditions, from diagnosing cancer to monitoring diabetes.

A microchip can capture and take snapshots of rare cancer cells circulating in the blood, which may provide a way to monitor patients after tumor removal and could eventually guide treatment, reports a new study in Science Translational Medicine. These circulating tumor cells, though small in number, might be an important marker that can help doctors quickly spot any changes in cancer progression and determine whether or not a particular treatment is working.