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Environmental sciences/Climatology/Climate change/Climate change mitigation

A blog co-written by: Tessa M. Hill (University of California Davis), Karina J. Nielsen (San Francisco State University), Emily Therese Cloyd (American Association for the Advancement of Science), Emily Knight (Lenfest Ocean Program)

Learn more about the Second Century Science Research Fellowship Program and its fellows.

The watershed of the world’s third largest estuary — the Chesapeake Bay — covers 64,000 square miles and is home to almost 18 million people who benefit from the flood control, food sources and recreational opportunities that the ecosystem provides.
Jeffrey Dukes gets straight to the point. “Climate change is real and it isn’t going to correct itself. The wise thing to do, in my opinion, is to prepare for those changes, and try to minimize [them].” He notes that communicating climate science is about engaging your audience, “speak[ing] to their values and concerns, not just tell[ing] them what you think they should hear.”
Jeffrey Dukes gets straight to the point. “Climate change is real and it isn’t going to correct itself. The wise thing to do, in my opinion, is to prepare for those changes, and try to minimize [them].” He notes that communicating climate science is about engaging your audience, “speak[ing] to their values and concerns, not just tell[ing] them what you think they should hear.”
The scientific community needs to more effectively speak out about the necessity of evidence-based policies, scientific integrity protections and public access to research to defend the role of science in society, said John Holdren, former White House science adviser, in a speech on the eve of the April 22 March for Science.
Three scientists have been awarded fellowships to conduct research in Acadia National Park as part of Second Century Stewardship, an initiative of the National Park Service, Schoodic Institute at Acadia National Park, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.