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Environmental sciences/Pollution/Pollutants

Anne Jefferson is finding ways to address the human side of climate science and stormwater management. Stormwater runoff, which carries urban, agricultural and industrial pollutants into waterways, has devastating consequences for water quality and ecosystems. Climate change increases the volume and velocity of the runoff, worsening flooding and pollution. Concrete steps can be taken, yet “we are not doing nearly enough to manage urban runoff,” says Jefferson. Broader dialogue among scientists, policymakers and other stakeholders about stormwater issues and urban climate resilience is needed. In addition, Jefferson, an associate professor of geology at Kent State University, says social science should be used more often to assess people’s responses to programs and how this influences implementation.
Aaron Kennedy, an assistant atmospheric sciences professor, recently encountered an atmosphere unlike anything he normally finds in his field work on the prevalence of extreme weather patterns around the world: the halls of Congress.
Early in her career, Noelle Selin realized the need to be involved in both science and policy. As an associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Selin studies toxic air pollutants and how these emissions affect humans and the environment. In the policy arena, she is a member of the executive committee for the International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant, where she helps bring scientific evidence into public decision-making. She also hopes to convey to other scientists and to policymakers that interacting with stakeholders (such as the people affected by a policy or involved in its implementation) can build a broader base of support for a policy, and their perspectives can also make it easier to implement and more effective.
Understanding how the five senses evolved can help inform how human sight, smell and taste continue to shift based on the environment, according to three researchers at the 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting in Boston.
There's definitely a lot of science involved in sports, and what better time to talk about some of it than during a worldwide quadrennial athletic event?
New Atlas Details Global Light Pollution