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Health and medicine/Diseases and disorders/Infectious diseases/Microbial infections/Viral infections/Smallpox

A day after a critical patent ruling on the gene-editing technology called CRISPR, researchers gathered at the 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting to discuss the technology’s future ethical and regulatory concerns surrounding its broader use.

When scientists participate in international collaborations, they must contend with a set of challenges that can be far more daunting than those posed by the research itself, according to a new report prepared by the Association of American Universities, the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, the FBI, and AAAS.

While widespread vaccination led to eradication of smallpox by 1979, a changed world and changing health priorities make it tougher to totally eliminate other infectious diseases, experts said at a AAAS meeting.

“Eradication of smallpox gave rise to a glow of optimism,” said Joshua Rosenthal, acting deputy director of the Fogarty International Center at the National Institutes of Health. If smallpox was gone, could measles, polio, and other diseases be far behind?