Skip to main content

Health and medicine/Human health

STPF alumni Jim Fleming and Kanya Long reflect on their experiences in the Roger Revelle Fellowship in Global Stewardship.

It hasn't shaped up as a great year for science and technology funding, but the process is far from over. It hasn't shaped up as a great year for science and technology funding, but the process is far from over.
President Donald Trump’s decision to withdraw the United States from the Paris Agreement puts future generations at risk and leaves the nation without a plan to mitigate the impact of climate change on society, said Rush Holt, CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, on June 1.
Tracey Holloway believes stakeholders should be part of the research process itself. That’s why for more than a decade, she has not only shared her air quality data with city, state and federal agencies who manage air pollution, she asks for their input on research projects as they are evolving. She wants to ensure her work “fills the gaps between existing science and stakeholders’ needs,” and isn’t just “scientists speaking to scientists.” These partnerships have been fruitful for Holloway, who says nearly all of her research contains some elements inspired by the air quality managers she works with.
Scientific organizations partnering with the March for Science are stressing the need for scientists to connect more directly with policymakers and the public both now and in the future to build support for science and explain its value for society.
Aaron Kennedy, an assistant atmospheric sciences professor, recently encountered an atmosphere unlike anything he normally finds in his field work on the prevalence of extreme weather patterns around the world: the halls of Congress.
AAAS CEO Rush Holt urged the Trump administration on Tuesday to work with the scientific community to reduce the risk climate change poses to human health and the environment, reiterating that climate change is real and its impacts are already evident.