Skip to main content

Life sciences/Biochemistry/Pharmacology/Drug development

An award ceremony at the AAAS Annual Meeting celebrated the accomplishments of early-career women scientists in the developing world, but a symposium the next day highlighted the challenges they are likely to face in advancing to leadership positions.

Bridging Science and Security for Biological Research

Researchers have identified a region on a chromosome in Plasmodium falciparum—a major malaria parasite—that helps to explain how the parasite developed resistance to the best known anti-malarial treatments in Southeast Asia.

Robert J. Lefkowitz, a AAAS member, was named a winner of the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his research on cell surface receptors.

As a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at Duke University since 1976, Lefkowitz was recognized for the new insights produced by

Diagnoses of mental illnesses such as depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia spike in adolescence and early adulthood, but researchers may one day be able to identify children at higher risk and prevent later onset, a leading neuroscientist said at a AAAS Capitol Hill briefing.

Toxicologists have long held that the dose makes the poison: A substance can cause harm only in amounts high enough to overwhelm the body’s defenses. But a major conceptual shift is underway, a leading expert said recently at AAAS, with much more attention being paid to low-dose chemical exposures and the impact they can have even many years later.

Bridging Science and Security

Researchers have developed antibodies that fight high blood sugar in mice, according to a new study in the 14 December issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine. These proteins could potentially be used to develop new drugs for type 2 diabetes, a condition that develops when the pancreas stops making insulin or when the body stops responding to insulin.

Drugs that help premature babies strengthen their lungs can also impair brain development even at low doses, reports a new study in the journal Science Translational Medicine. This study brings new knowledge to the table that could help doctors and parents make more informed decisions on how to treat preemies.