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Life sciences/Biochemistry/Pharmacology/Drug resistance

Whole-genome sequencing of drug-resistant bacteria during a hospital outbreak could help infection control efforts, reports a new study in the 22 August issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine.

The report details the steps taken after a 2011 outbreak of Klebsiella pneumoniae at a clinical center located at the National Institutes of Health. Six of the 18 patients infected during the outbreak died.

A new drug based on a natural compound produced by the human body halts one of the earliest stages of HIV infection, reports a new study in the journal Science Translational Medicine. The drug may be able to slow down emerging resistance of the virus to antiretroviral drugs, a growing problem worldwide.

Called VIR-576, the drug interacts with HIV’s ability to insert the “sticky” end of its outer membrane—the fusion peptide—into the host cell at the start of infection. This ability to block fusion peptides makes VIR-576 very different from other HIV drugs.

A new drug based on a natural compound produced by the human body halts one of the earliest stages of HIV infection, reports a new study in the journal Science Translational Medicine. The drug may be able to slow down emerging resistance of the virus to antiretroviral drugs, a growing problem worldwide.

Called VIR-576, the drug interacts with HIV’s ability to insert the “sticky” end of its outer membrane—the fusion peptide—into the host cell at the start of infection. This ability to block fusion peptides makes VIR-576 very different from other HIV drugs.

A new tuberculosis vaccine boosts the effectiveness of a childhood vaccine and protects against the growing worldwide problem of drug-resistant tuberculosis bacteria, reports a new study in Science Translational Medicine.

The vaccine is now being developed for clinical testing in humans, and if successful will help protect against the growing army of drug-resistant tuberculosis bacteria and disease that many consider a global public health emergency.

By returning to traditional screening methods, researchers have identified an effective anti-malarial drug candidate, known as NITD609, which seems to kill the blood stages of the two major malaria parasites when administered orally, just once a day. This discovery is especially timely since researchers in Asia have begun to report a building resistance to artemisinin, the main ingredient in current malaria treatments for about 100 million patients each year.