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Scientific community/Education/Educational attainment/Continuing education

Early in her career, Noelle Selin realized the need to be involved in both science and policy. As an associate professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Selin studies toxic air pollutants and how these emissions affect humans and the environment. In the policy arena, she is a member of the executive committee for the International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant, where she helps bring scientific evidence into public decision-making. She also hopes to convey to other scientists and to policymakers that interacting with stakeholders (such as the people affected by a policy or involved in its implementation) can build a broader base of support for a policy, and their perspectives can also make it easier to implement and more effective.
Grace Naledi Mandisa Pandor, who has used science and technology to support development in South Africa and sub-Saharan Africa, has been chosen by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) to receive the 2016 Award for Science Diplomacy.

What does it mean to live in a universe that is ever-expanding? Will discoveries about early galaxy formation and extrasolar planets change our assumptions about our place in the world? If believing in the power of a placebo can trigger the body’s immune-system responses, could religious faith help promote healing, too?