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Scientific community/Scientific facilities/Laboratories

The scientific process is endangered by a lawsuit seeking disclosure of a cache of emails between two University of Arizona climate scientists, says an amicus brief AAAS joined.
A new noninvasive method for analyzing routine heart scans can identify dangerous inflammation in patients at risk for cardiac disease.
Determining if a fire is accidental or due to arson is a process often plagued by poorly understood science, subjective judgments on the part of investigators and inadequately trained personnel, according to a new AAAS report on the quality of fire investigation in the United States.
In response to a Department of Justice request for public comment on advancing forensic science, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, along with the American Chemical Society, Federation of Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences, and the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, has submitted comments that highlight the need for a transparent and independent review of forensic science techniques to ensure that “rigorous science is used in convicting the guilty and exonerating the innocent.”
“A scientist walks into a comedy club,” could easily be the set up for a joke. Yet, several researchers have recently started stepping out from behind their laboratory benches and into the spotlights at open mic nights. These new comedic species are not only making their audiences laugh with smart humor, but they are also experimenting with new ways for scientists to interact with the broader public.
Edward Emil David Jr., a leader in government science policy and industrial research and development for over five decades, died at his home in Bedminster, New Jersey on February 13. He was 92.