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Social sciences/Education/Educational levels/Undergraduate education

The new class of Invention Ambassadors represent the spirit of today’s inventors through their dedication to improving the world we live in and inspiring the next generation of inventors. They are a diverse group of eight inventors who are driving advancements in accessibility, security, healthcare delivery, and sustainability, among other areas. Members of this class include representatives of the public and private sectors, small businesses, academia, and Fortune 500 companies.

Learn more about our 2018-2019 Invention Ambassadors and Alumni Ambassadors.

The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) offers paid full-time and part-time internships throughout the year. All opportunities are located at the AAAS headquarters located in downtown Washington, DC, and last up to 12 weeks. AAAS internships are open to undergraduate and graduate students and recent college graduates. As an Intern  you can expect to:

  1. Collaborate with employees and other interns professionally and socially,

  2. Apply knowledge attained through your education to real work situations, 

  3. Learn about AAAS as a whole and understand the organization outside of your assigned department, and

  4. Benefit from clear expectations and instructions from experienced employees in similar fields.

A smart phone application to de-escalate tensions during traffic stops, a voting machine to give the disabled an accessible way to cast a ballot and a community-based research project to test the impact of mining on the Hopi Navajo Reservation’s groundwater provide snapshots of practicing science through the lens of human rights, presentations at an American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting showed.
This summer, two media fellowships run by AAAS sent scientists and interns into newsrooms where they wrote hundreds of science news articles.
Examples of “fake news,” such as a report that Pope Francis had endorsed Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, are the equivalent of a bad cold in the body politic, says Dan Kahan, a professor of law and psychology at Yale University. But much more troubling, he told a session of the 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting, are the “toxic memes” Trump has mastered that represent what he called “a cancer” on enlightened democracy.