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Social sciences/Psychology/Clinical psychology/Psychiatric disorders/Affective disorders/Depression

AAAS Neuroscience and Society Event Showcases Games’ Effects on Brain, Behavior The typical client at ReSTART treatment center is young, male, depressed, anxious, sleep-deprived, failing in school or at work, poorly developed physically, unfamiliar with normal dating relationships — and living every possible moment in front of a screen.

Ayumu the chimpanzee didn’t hesitate. Shown the numbers one through nine on a computer touch screen, he tapped the numerals in order, even after two through eight had disappeared behind white squares within a fraction of a second. The human audience watching a video of this performance began to murmur as they tried and failed to keep up with the fast-fingered chimp.

“Don’t worry, no one can do it,” Kyoto University researcher Tetsuro Matsuzawa reassured them with a laugh. “It’s impossible for you.”

Diagnoses of mental illnesses such as depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia spike in adolescence and early adulthood, but researchers may one day be able to identify children at higher risk and prevent later onset, a leading neuroscientist said at a AAAS Capitol Hill briefing.