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Space sciences/Planetary science

Carl Zimmer to speak on science reporting in age of fake news at Stony Brook University on Oct. 12 Three prominent journalists will discuss the challenges of accurately reporting and presenting the latest science news in a series of campus lectures.
Second Century Stewardship fellows took part in a communications workshop designed to improve how scientists share their research with the public.
“A scientist walks into a comedy club,” could easily be the set up for a joke. Yet, several researchers have recently started stepping out from behind their laboratory benches and into the spotlights at open mic nights. These new comedic species are not only making their audiences laugh with smart humor, but they are also experimenting with new ways for scientists to interact with the broader public.
Naomi Oreskes has a question for scientists that many have been asking themselves already: should they speak up on politically sensitive topics, or should they let the facts of their research speak for themselves? In her plenary address at the 2017 AAAS Annual Meeting, Oreskes said facts alone do not speak very well without context when it comes to issues such as climate change. Scientists should consider themselves as sentinels, she said, responsibly raising the alarm to government officials and others about what the data show and even offering possible solutions to science-based problems.