21 Sep

Chat Series: S&T Policy Fellowship Opportunities for Social Scientists

21 Sep 2016
2:00 pm to 3:00 pm

You will have a chance to submit advance questions when you RSVP. To view additional chats in this series click here.

Seeking to gain hands-on policy experience and apply your STEM training to address societal challenges? Are you a social scientist (psychologist, anthropologist, sociologist, economist) wondering if an S&T Policy Fellowship is right for you? Policy fellows with a background in social sciences have much to contribute and gain from the fellowship experience. Collaborate and brainstorm with high ranking policy leaders. And do it in the company of 200+ talented global scientists and engineers.

The application season for the 2017-18 fellowship year runs from May to November 1. Each month during this period we will host a live chat featuring current and alumni fellows. Join us on September 21, 2:00 p.m. ET for a video chat with fellows who share a background in social sciences!

The AAAS S&T Policy Fellowships are open to U.S. citizens who hold doctoral level degrees in any of the following:

  • Medical and Health sciences.
  • Biological, Physical or Earth sciences.
  • Social and Behavioral sciences.
  • Computational sciences and Mathematics.
  • Engineering disciplines (applicants with a MS in engineering and three years of professional experience also qualify).

Read an overview of S&T Policy Fellowships (STPF) here, so we’ll have more time to answer specific questions relevant to you.

Chat Participants

Staff: Salaeha Shariff

Fellows:

Emily Eisenhauer

Emily Eisenhauer, 2015-17 Executive Branch Fellow, Environmental Protection Agency

Dr. Emily Eisenhauer is currently a AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow. Her placement is at the Environmental Protection Agency in their Office of Research and Development where she is pursuing projects on community engaged research, climate resilience, and integrating social and environmental science.

Previously she worked for the Florida International University Center for Labor Research and Studies and the University of Miami Office of Civic and Community Engagement.

She received her Ph.D. in Sociology from Florida International University, where she completed her dissertation on climate vulnerability in South Florida.

 

Ariela Zycherman

Ariela Zycherman, PhD, 2015-17 Executive Branch Fellow, National Science Foundation

Dr. Ariela Zycherman is an AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellow at the National Science Foundation (NSF) in the Directorate for Engineering in the Division of Chemical, Bioengineering, Environmental and Transport systems (CBET).

Her expertise includes the intersections between food, environment, politics, and economy. Before coming to NSF she was a Postdoctoral Fellow of Food Studies at the Institute for the Humanities at the University of Illinois, Chicago.

Ariela has a PhD in Applied Anthropology from Columbia University.

 

Irina Feygina

Irina Feygina, PhD, 2013-14 American Psychological Association, Congressional Fellow

Dr. Irina Feygina was an American Psychological Association Congressional Fellow in the office of Senator Michael Bennet (D-CO) working on the energy and environment portfolios.

She is currently the Director of Behavioral Science and Assessment, at Climate Central. She integrates behavioral science insights into Climate Central’s work and improves its tracking of program success. In her day-to-day work, Dr. Feygina oversees projects ranging from a large-scale collaboration with the National Academies of Science on skepticism of mainstream science to our continued research on the framing of attribution messages.

Prior to joining Climate Central, Dr. Feygina also served as a Fellow on the White House Social and Behavioral Sciences Team, where she applied insights from behavioral economics to improve program implementation across the federal government.

She received her Ph.D. in Social Psychology from New York University, where her research focused on the role of motivated reasoning in climate change skepticism.