31 Aug

Enhance Your Career via the S&T Policy Fellowships: Judicial Fellowship

31 Aug 2016
2:00 pm to 3:00 pm

To view additional chats in this series click here.

Are you seeking a sabbatical or yearlong fellowship to enhance your career and gain hands-on policy experience? Interested in applying your professional experience to address societal challenges? Transform your career and join a highly influential network of fellows.  

S&T Policy Fellowships (STPF) is seeking experienced STEM professionals for the Judicial Fellowship. STPF hosted a live video chat with alumni of the Judicial fellowship to discuss how the fellowship transformed their career.

The AAAS S&T Policy Fellowships in the executive and legislative Branches are open to U.S. citizens and doctoral level degree holders in any of the following:

  • Medical and Health sciences.
  • Biological, Physical or Earth sciences.
  • Social and Behavioral sciences.
  • Computational sciences and Mathematics.
  • Engineering disciplines (applicants with a MS in engineering and three years of professional experience also qualify).

The Judicial fellowship is open to applicants with a minimum of three years of post-doctoral professional experience. Applicants with a J.D. degree or legal experience are preferred.

Chat Participants

Staff: Rick Kempinski

Fellows: 

Shubha Ghosh, PhD, JD, 2014-15 Judicial Branch Fellow, Federal Judicial Center

Shubha Ghosh, was the 2014-15 Judicial Branch Fellow at the Federal Judicial Center (FJC). At the FJC he built on his specialties in intellectual property and economic analysis of legal policy. He worked with researchers at the FJC to investigate current policy issues confronting federal courts in addressing patent litigation. Dr. Ghosh’s work builds on his extensive writings in intellectual property law and policy, particularly on the role of patent law in promoting innovation and competitiveness. 

He currently serves as Director of the Technology Law Program and as Crandall Melvin Professor of Law at Syracuse University College of Law. His focus is on the development and commercialization of technology as a means of promoting economic and social development. He has written extensively on pharmaceutical patents, parallel importation, antitrust law, commercialization and other uses of data, and the role of intellectual property policy in shaping these diverse areas. 

Dr. Ghosh has held positions as a tenured full professor at SUNY-Buffalo Law School and SMU Dedman School of Law. He is engaged as an active scholar and teacher and has also served as a consultant on several intellectual property and antitrust cases with national law firms. Professor Ghosh has also worked with the World Intellectual Property Organization on the relationship between traditional knowledge and legal systems.  He has provided legal commentary for SquawkBox, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, Marketplace on NPR, Financial Times, and other media publications. He received his PhD in economics from the University of Michigan and holds a law degree from Stanford Law School.