Highlights from Sci on the Fly: May 2017

In this edition: a new podcast series on the daily lives of scientists; President Trump’s response to climate change from a business perspective; and a new blog series on exploring questions on feedback.

Podcast: Scientists are People Too, Episode 1

Host and current fellow at the National Institutes of Health Danielle Friend introduces listeners to a new podcast series “Scientists are People Too” in which scientists are asked about their work and daily lives. For the first episode Friend asks, “What is the biggest mistake you have made in science or the most expensive piece of equipment you have broken?”  From broken MRIs and overwhelmed supercomputers to shattered beakers and lost data troves, we hear from a variety of scientists.

The President Should Heed the Business Community on Climate Change

Current fellow Adam Rosenblatt makes a business case for why President Trump should address climate change. Rosenblatt comments on how Coca-Cola and other American corporations are remaining engaged in the Paris climate agreement because of the risk facing their companies from climate change. Rosenblatt notes how Trump’s own properties are at risk of major damage from flooding and storm surges.

Feedback: Turning on Directions

Like Danielle Friend, current Legislative Branch Fellow Kyle Wesson introduces us to a new Sci on the Fly series—this one exploring questions on feedback. Kyle opens with one of the most memorable scenes from the popular sitcom, The Office, where the main character Michael relies too heavily on his GPS directing him to turn right, right into a lake. Comparing GPS with London cab drivers, Wesson paints a picture of the need to use feedback to augment, rather than replace, our knowledge and skills.