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Speakers and Moderators

 

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Dr. Rachel Adams is a Research Scientist in the Plant and Microbial Biology Department at the University of California, Berkeley, and in the Environmental Health Laboratory Branch at the California Department of Public Health. She is an ecologist and microbiologist, and her research focuses on the sources, dynamics, and health implications of microbes in indoor environments. She uses sequence-based technology to study microbial exposures in indoor environments and has developed methods to improve the identification of microbes. Her work bridges microbiome science with chemistry, engineering, and epidemiology to better understand how indoor environments can serve as distinctive habitats for microbes and how the diversity of microbes and their products affects their human co-habitants. Thus, this fundamental research has direct implications for monitoring buildings and for promoting healthy housing. Currently, Dr. Adams is the principal investigator on an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation grant entitled, “CHEMM: Chemistry of Homes – Environmental Microbes and Moisture.” She has over 40 publications across many different environmental systems — all rooted in efforts to understand the causes of and consequences on biological diversity. Dr. Adams holds a B.S. from Georgetown University and a Ph.D. from Stanford University and is a member of the Mycological Society of America, the American Society of Microbiology (ASM), and the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate (ISIAQC).

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Dr. Matthew Coggon is a Research Scientist at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and the Chemical Sciences Division of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Earth System Research Laboratory. He earned his doctorate degree in chemical engineering from the California Institute of Technology in 2015. He studies volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are gaseous compounds emitted from anthropogenic and natural sources that are known to modulate air quality in urban environments. Dr. Coggon measures these compounds by deploying state-of-the-art mass spectrometers on aircraft and on mobile laboratories to measure the emission rates and chemical transformations of VOCs from a variety of sources, including vehicle exhaust, oil and natural gas emissions, wildfires, and consumer products. This and similar work have yielded over 42 publications. Presently, Dr. Coggon and colleagues are investigating the extent to which consumer product emissions, which are primarily emitted indoors, impact the formation of regulated pollutants in the outdoor environment.  
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Dr. Richard Corsi is Dean of the Maseeh College of Engineering and Computer Science at Portland State University, and the Joe J. King Chair Emeritus of Engineering #2 and Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus at the University of Texas at Austin.  Dr. Corsi’s research team has studied indoor atmospheric chemistry for nearly three decades, significantly expanding knowledge on (1) the volatilization of chemicals from water to indoor air, (2) interactions between volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and indoor materials, (3) building decontamination chemistry, (4) ozone interactions with indoor materials, and (5) the control of indoor ozone and associated reaction products.  He has supervised 20 Ph.D. students, 53 M.S. students, and over 50 undergraduate students in research and has taught courses in Fluid Mechanics, Indoor Air Quality, Indoor Air Quality: Physics and Chemistry, and Human Exposure to Indoor Air Pollution.  Dr. Corsi’s has served as Director of a unique National Science Foundation IGERT program entitled Indoor Environmental Science and Engineering (from 2006 to 2012) that helped to educate a generation of Ph.D.s who are now leaders in indoor air quality research.  He also served as President of Indoor Air 2011, a major international conference related to indoor air quality. Dr. Corsi has been honored with numerous teaching awards, including a University of Texas system-wide award for outstanding teaching, and he received Distinguished Alumnus awards from Humboldt State University (2006) and the College of Engineering at the University of California, Davis (2016).  Dr. Corsi is currently President of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate’s Academy of Fellows. 

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Dr. Destaillats is a Staff Scientist and Deputy Leader of the Indoor Environment Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and is interested in the chemistry of the built environment and urban systems. Prior to joining LBNL in 2003, he was a postdoctoral researcher at the California Institute of Technology (1998-2001) and at the University of California, Davis (2001-2003). He received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina, in 1998. Dr. Destaillats is on the editorial board of the journal Indoor Air and has been elected to the International Society for Indoor Air Quality and Climate (ISIAQ) Academy of Fellows. His research focuses on the sources, transport, and chemical transformations of indoor trace pollutants, with the aim of preventing or mitigating harmful human exposure. A major initiative of his, funded by the State of California, is the study of thirdhand tobacco smoke and the contaminants released by emerging tobacco products such as electronic cigarettes. He is also interested in advancing new technologies and materials for healthy and energy-efficient built environments, including indoor air purification technologies. Dr. Destaillats has published almost 70 articles in peer-reviewed journals and two book chapters, and he holds three US patents. His work has been featured in The Washington Post, US News & World Report, LA Times, Chemical & Engineering News, BBC News (UK), The Telegraph (UK), Radio Canada, BFMTV (France), Le Figaro (France), and Der Spiegel (Germany), among other media outlets. In 2018, his team received the LBNL Director’s Award for Exceptional Achievements in the category Social Impact. More details can be found at hdestaillats.lbl.gov.

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Ms. Mary Dickinson is a Regional Sustainable Design Leader for Perkins+Will architectural firm and a member of the firm’s Sustainable Design Council and Research Board, in which roles she assures that sustainable, low-impact design is an integral part of the firm’s projects and practice. Her knowledge extends across various project types, including healthcare, education, and corporate projects. Fueled by her passion towards refining the role and impact of the built environment on human and ecological health, she also leads the firm’s research efforts as Co-Director of the firmwide Material Performance Lab. Ms. Dickinson’s work includes the management of the publicly available Transparency Site and Precautionary List – a gathering point for resources, news and data supporting the open and honest disclosure of building material ingredients. In addition, her research group has implemented a standard for building material libraries to help identify substances of concern and has completed multiple whitepapers on toxicants and materials standards for clients. To help the greater design industry improve its material vetting process, Ms. Dickinson shares her expertise as a part of the American Institute of Architect’s (AIA) Materials Knowledge Working Group, the Health Product Declaration® Collaborative (HPDC) Advisory group, and the “mindful MATERIAL” Steering Committee, and as Vice-Chair of the U.S. Green Building Council’s North Texas Council and of AIA Dallas’ Committee on the Environment.

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Dr. Allen Goldstein received his B.A. and B.S. degrees from the University of California (UC) at Santa Cruz in politics and chemistry, and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in chemistry from Harvard University. He joined the faculty at UC Berkeley in 1996 and is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and in the Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, where he served as department chair from 2007-2010.  He further served as co-Chair of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry program (IGAC) from 2013-2016. Dr. Goldstein’s research program encompasses anthropogenic air pollution, biosphere-atmosphere exchange of radiatively and chemically active trace gases, and the development and application of novel instrumentation to investigate the organic chemistry of Earth’s atmosphere. He engages in field measurement campaigns, controlled laboratory experiments, and modeling activities covering indoor, urban, rural, regional, intercontinental, and global scale studies of aerosols and their gas phase precursors. His focal research questions include: What controls atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases, photochemical oxidants, and aerosols? How do terrestrial ecosystems interact chemically and physically with earth's atmosphere? Professor Goldstein’s honors include the American Geophysical Union Atmospheric Sciences Section Yoram J. Kaufman Unselfish Cooperation in Research Award (2019); the David Sinclair Award from the American Association for Aerosol Research (2018); and the Alexander P. Humboldt Research Award in Germany (2017).  He has also served as a Fulbright Senior Scholar in Italy (2018) and in Australia (2005), been elected a Fellow of the American Geophysical Union (2011) and of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2018), and recognized as a Highly Cited Researcher by Clarivate Analytics (2017 and 2018, ranking in the top 1% Web of Science citations for the field).

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Dr. Vicki H. Grassian joined the faculty at University of California – San Diego as Distinguished Professor with appointments in the Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Nanoengineering and Scripps Institution of Oceanography and holds the Distinguished Chair of Physical Chemistry. She is currently the Chair of the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Co-Director of the Center for Aerosol Impacts on Chemistry of the Environment. Professor Grassian’s research focuses on the chemistry and impacts of environmental interfaces, including atmospheric aerosols, indoor surfaces, and nanomaterials. She has given over 300 invited talks and presentations on this research and has published over 300 peer-reviewed publications and 16 book chapters. Dr Grassian’s recent awards include the 2019 William H. Nichols Medal Award for her contributions to the chemistry of environmental interfaces, and the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry 2019 Distinguished Women in Chemistry or Chemical Engineering Award. In 2018, she received the American Institute of Chemists Chemical Pioneer Award, and in 2014, she was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry John Jeyes Award for her pioneering contributions to the chemistry of environmental interfaces, heterogeneous atmospheric chemistry and the environmental implications of nanomaterials. Among other earlier awards, she also received the National American Chemical Society Award for Creative Advances in Environmental Science and Technology for her original and creative contributions in understanding mineral dust aerosol and its impact on atmospheric chemistry and climate. Dr. Grassian is a Fellow of several societies that include the American Chemical Society, the Royal Society of Chemistry, the American Physical Society and the Association for the Advancement of Science.

 

Ms. Laura Kolb is a scientist with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and holds a Master of Public Health degree in occupational and environmental health from George Washington University. Ms. Kolb has been with the EPA for more than 25 years and currently manages the Center for Scientific Analysis at the EPA’s Office of Radiation and Indoor Air, Indoor Environments Division (IED). The Indoor Environments Division is a non-regulatory program that covers indoor air issues such as particulate matter, indoor chemistry, mold and moisture control, radon, environmental tobacco smoke, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), indoor asthma triggers, and indoor air quality in homes, schools, and commercial buildings. Recent key publications available from the IED include consumer and technical guides such as Guide to Air Cleaners in the Home: Portable Air Cleaners, Furnace and HVAC Filters; all materials are free on the website www.epa.gov/iaq.

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Mr. Dunstan L. Macauley, P.E. is a building systems practitioner with over twenty years of experience in the design of engineering systems for the built environment. He joined Setty and Associates in 2018 as the Director of Mechanical Engineering, specializing in the design of a variety of systems for commercial and institutional projects. Mr. Macauley is a graduate of the University of Maryland and is a registered professional engineer in New York State and the District of Columbia. Mr. Macauley is also an ASHRAE-certified, High-Performance Building Design Professional. Mr. Macauley currently serves on the ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers) Board of Directors as the Region III Director and Regional Chair. Founded in 1894, ASHRAE is a global leader in the advancement of human well-being through sustainable technology for the built environment. As an industry leader in research, standards writing, publishing, certification and continuing education, ASHRAE and its members are committed to shaping tomorrow’s built environment today through strategic partnerships with organizations in the Heating, Ventilation, Air-Conditioning, and Refrigeration (HVAC&R) community and across related industries. 

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Dr. Glenn Morrison is a professor of Environmental Science and Engineering at the University of North Carolina and has been studying indoor and outdoor air pollution and human exposure for 30 years. He received his Ph.D. from Berkeley and his research has primarily been related to indoor atmospheric physics and chemistry. He has particular expertise in interfacial (surface) chemistry, having also worked as a chemical engineer on heterogeneous catalysis. This research has included ozone-surface chemistry, acid-base chemistry and its role in connection to indoor surfaces, methamphetamine contamination in buildings, modelling of aerosolized semi-volatile organic compounds, and building forensics. In recent years, he has also focused on the role of clothing in indoor chemistry and the exposure of occupants to potentially toxic substances. Dr. Morrison has organized numerous workshops to bring outdoor and indoor chemists together to discuss indoor chemistry and he co-organized the conference Indoor Air 2011 in Austin, TX, as Vice President and Technical Chair of the conference. He served as the President of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate (ISIAQ) from 2014-2016 and now is a Fellow of ISIAQ.  Besides work done in connection as part of the University of North Carolina, collaborations are ongoing with the Missouri University of Science and Technology, with the Fraunhofer Institute for Wood Research at the Wilhelm-Klauditz-Institut in Germany, and with the Technical University of Denmark (DTU).

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Dr. Lesliam Quirós-Alcalá is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Maryland Institute of Applied Environmental Health at the University of Maryland School of Public Health. She is also an Affiliate Researcher at the Center for Environmental Research and Children’s Health (CERCH) at the University of California (UC) at Berkeley. Dr. Quirós-Alcalá received her Ph.D. in Environmental Health Sciences from UC Berkeley and conducted her postdoctoral work at CERCH. She also holds a MSc in Safety Engineering and Industrial Hygiene, and a BSc in Biomedical Engineering from Texas A&M University. Prior to pursuing her PhD, she worked in industry and government. Her research focuses on characterizing exposures to environmental contaminants and examining their potential health effects on vulnerable minority populations underrepresented and understudied in public health research, including occupational populations, pregnant women and women of reproductive age, and children. Her research also seeks to design and implement culturally-appropriate interventions to reduce environmental health disparities among vulnerable populations. She is on the Scientific Advisory Board for the Children’s Environmental Health Network and in the Governor’s Commission on Environmental Justice and Sustainable Communities for the State of Maryland, and she serves as Secretary for the International Society of Exposure Science (ISES). She is Associate Editor for several journals in her field and was recently recognized with the 2019 ISES Joan M. Daisey Outstanding Young Scientist Award, which recognizes outstanding contributions to the science of human exposure analysis by a young scientist.  

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Mr. Mahesh Ramanujam is proving that building a more sustainable world is no longer a dream, but a global evolution. As president and CEO of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) and Green Business Certification, Inc. (GBCI), he leads a community of 13 million people that’s growing every day. A graduate from India’s Annamalai University with a degree in Computer Engineering, Ramanujam couples a strong background in technology and innovation with his goal of building healthier communities and democratizing sustainable living. Ramanujam serves on numerous boards and advisory committees, including Bank of America’s National Community Advisory Council and the Board of Directors of GRESB, a private organization wholly owned by GBCI and that is the leading sustainability standard for global real estate portfolios and infrastructure assets. Before becoming President and CEO of USGBC, Ramanujam served as both the organization’s COO and CIO. Prior to joining GBCI in 2009, he was COO of Emergys Corp., and for more than a decade, he successfully led various business transformation programs at IBM and Lenovo. Transformative thought programs, partnerships, and initiatives continue to be at the heart of Ramanujam’s work today. He leads hundreds of employees and thousands of volunteers who work tirelessly as the backbone of the green building movement. He believes that sustainable living is not just about the physical building and rebuilding of our communities, but ultimately about our willingness to reimagine the way we treat each other. He envisions a world where construction is as much about compassion as it is about the convenience and efficiency of the structures themselves. And most importantly, behind every strategy, he emphasizes our universal responsibility to prioritize health and wellness, to make a commitment to the longevity of our planet, and to create a better quality of life for ourselves and future generations.

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Dr. Manabu Shiraiwa is an Associate Professor of Chemistry at the University of California, Irvine. He has worked as group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry Mainz, Germany (2013-2016) and as a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) postdoc fellow at the California Institute of Technology (2012-2013). He received a B.S. and a M.S. at the University of Tokyo and a Ph.D. from the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in 2011. Dr. Shiraiwa’s expertise is on kinetic modeling of multiphase processes on human skin, clothing, and indoor surfaces. He currently serves as the principal investigator of the Modeling Consortium for Chemistry of Indoor Environments (MOCCIE), funded by the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. MOCCIE connects models over a range of spatial and temporal scales, from molecular to room scales and from nanosecond to days, respectively, and the Consortium now aims to develop integrated physical-chemical models that include representations of gas-phase, aerosol-phase, and surface chemistry and of how occupants, indoor activities and buildings influence these indoor processes. Besides indoor chemistry, Dr. Shiraiwa’s research group investigates the properties and interactions of organic aerosols and reactive oxygen species, as well as their effects on air quality and public health. He has received a number of awards, including: the international Commission on Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Pollution (iCaCGP) Paul J. Crutzen Award (2018), the Walter A. Rosenblith Award of the Health Effects Institute (2018), the National Science Foundation CAREER Award (2017), the Sheldon K. Friedlander Award of the American Association for Aerosol Research (2014), the Paul Crutzen Prize of the German Chemical Society (2012) and the Otto Hahn Medal of the Max Planck Society (2011).

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Dr. Heather M. Stapleton is the Dan & Bunny Gabel Associate Professor, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University. Dr. Stapleton received her Ph.D. in environmental chemistry from the University of Maryland in 2003, after which she spent two years in the Analytical Chemistry Division of the National Institute of Standards and Technology as a National Research Council Postdoctoral Fellow. In 2005, she joined the faculty at Duke University, North Carolina, and developed a research laboratory specializing in environmental chemistry and exposure science at the Nicholas School of the Environment. She currently serves as Deputy Director for the Duke Superfund Research Center, and she is co-Director of the Duke Environmental Exposomics Laboratory. Her current research projects focus on identifying flame-retardant chemicals in consumer products, exploring different routes of human exposure to semi-volatile organic chemicals (SVOCs) and examining mechanisms of thyroid hormone dysregulation. In 2012, she testified in front of the US Senate Environment and Public Works Committee regarding human exposure and toxicity of new-use flame retardants. Her work has been featured on CBS News, Fox News, and in the Atlantic, National Geographic, and Chemical Watch, among others. Dr. Stapleton is also a member of the Duke Cancer Institute and has secondary appointments in the Pratt School of Engineering and in the Department of Pediatrics in the Duke School of Medicine.

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Dr. Barbara Turpin is Department Chair and Professor of Environmental Sciences and Engineering at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill. She combines laboratory experiments, chemical modeling and field research to improve our understanding of linkages between air pollution emissions and subsequent human exposure. Research interests include indoor chemistry and secondary organic aerosol formation through aqueous chemistry.  Professor Turpin received a B.S. from the California Institute of Technology and Ph.D. from Oregon Graduate Institute of Science & Technology (OGI) at the Oregon Health Sciences University. She conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Minnesota Particle Technology Laboratory and was a Professor at Rutgers University for 20 years before joining the University of North Carolina. She is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, of the American Geophysical Union, and of the American Association for Aerosol Research (AAAR). Professor Turpin is also a Past President of the AAAR. She is currently an Associate Editor of the journal Environmental Science and Technology (ES&T). Dr. Turpin is a recipient of Atmospheric Environment’s Haagen Smit Prize (2009), AAAR’s Sinclair Award (2010) and the American Chemical Society’s award for Creative Advances in Environmental Sciences and Technology (2018).

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Dr. Marina Vance is an Assistant Professor and the McLagan Family Faculty Fellow in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Colorado (CU) Boulder, with an additional appointment in the Environmental Engineering Program. Her research is centered on applying engineering tools to better understand and minimize human exposure to novel environmental contaminants that may occur from everyday activities and the use of consumer products. Her research group focuses on experimental investigations into the physical and chemical characteristics of aerosols, from emissions to subsequent transformations, in both indoor and outdoor environments. She is one of the principal investigators of the HOMEChem (House Observations of Microbial and Environmental Chemistry) study, an investigation into how everyday activities such as cooking, cleaning, human occupancy and the use of personal care products affect the chemistry of indoor environments. Before joining CU - Boulder, Dr. Vance was the Associate Director of the Virginia Tech (VT) Center for Sustainable Nanotechnology and the Deputy Director of the VT National Center for Earth and Environmental Nanotechnology Infrastructure (NanoEarth). Dr. Vance received her Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from Virginia Tech in 2012 for studying the release of nanomaterials, especially silver nanoparticles, from the use of everyday consumer products. Prior to her VT work, she received her B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees in environmental engineering from the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianópolis, Brazil, with a focus on air quality research, including characterizing odors as a form of air pollution and understanding indoor air quality in hospital environments.

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Dr. Ray Wells began his research career in chemistry as an undergraduate at the Georgia Institute of Technology, Georgia, investigating hydroxyl radical and nitrate radical kinetics. He then went on to receive his M.S. and Ph.D. in physical inorganic chemistry from Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, exploring the gas-phase kinetics of organometallic compounds.  Afterwards, Dr. Wells worked for the U.S. Air Force for seven years assessing the atmospheric chemistry of industrial solvents. In 1999, he joined the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in Morgantown, West Virginia.  Since 2001, Ray has been the Team Leader of the Gas and Vapor Team in the Exposure Assessment Branch. He and his team have investigated the gas-phase, surface-phase, and particle-phase chemistry of terpene oxidation present in indoor environments, and they have also worked to develop new sampling technologies.  

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Dr. Jonathan Williams is an atmospheric chemist. He completed his B.Sc. in Chemistry and French and his Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences at the University of East Anglia, England, and, after working as a postdoctoral researcher at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Aeronomy laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, USA, he became a research group leader at the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Germany. His primary research focus is the chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the atmosphere, and he has participated in many international field campaigns on aircraft and ships, and at ground stations. In particular, Dr Williams has been examining VOCs from the Amazonian rainforest and how they are oxidized in the atmosphere. He is an editor for several international journals and the author of over 200 publications as well as the textbook “The Atmospheric Chemist´s Companion.” He also currently serves as adjunct Professor at the Cyprus Institute, in Cyprus. Recently, Dr. Williams has begun researching the VOCs emitted by people and has conducted novel, real-world experiments in football stadiums and movie theaters, the results of which highlighted the potential impact of these human emissions on indoor air chemistry. This year, he began co-ordinating the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation-funded project Indoor Chemical Human Emissions and Reactivity (ICHEAR) to help comprehensively characterize the chemistry associated with human beings.

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Dr. Cora Young is the Guy Warwick Rogers Chair in Chemistry and an assistant professor at York University, in Toronto, Canada. She completed her undergraduate and doctoral studies at the Department of Chemistry at the University of Toronto and a postdoctoral fellowship at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in Boulder, Colorado.  Dr. Young served as an assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry at Memorial University from 2012 to 2017, before joining the Department of Chemistry at York University in July of 2017. Her research focuses on the development and application of new analytical techniques to increase our understanding of issues regarding indoor and outdoor air quality, climate change, and long-distance pollutant transport. Her group uses in situ and offline instrumentation in both laboratory and field studies to elucidate the chemical mechanisms underlying these processes. Dr. Young’s work has been featured in journals such as Indoor Air, Environmental Science and Technology, Nature Geosciences, Environmental Science: Processes and Impacts, and Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.