Science Diplomacy: An Introduction

 

This one-hour course, hosted by Dr. Marga Gual Soler and Dr. Tom Wang of the AAAS Center for Science Diplomacy, is the first ever online course fully dedicated to science diplomacy. It includes the basic definitions and frameworks of science diplomacy, its evolution in history, and several case studies with interviews with top practitioners in the field. Join us and learn all about the connections between science and diplomacy throughout the ages. 


COURSE CONTENT AND FEATURED EXPERTS

1. Introduction
MARGA GUAL SOLER, Project Director, AAAS Center for Science Diplomacy
TOM WANG, Director, AAAS Center for Science Diplomacy

7. Diplomacy for Science
MANDË HOLFORD, Associate Professor in Chemical Biology, Hunter College

2. Interactions between Science and Diplomacy
GREG STONE, EVP & Chief Scientist for Oceans, Conservation International

8. Science for Diplomacy

3. Overcoming Preconceptions

9. Science in Diplomacy
KRISTINA GJERDE, Adjunct Profesor, MIIS

4. A Brief History of Science Diplomacy

10. Transboundary Resources and Shared Spaces
GOSIA SMIESZEK, Researcher, Arctic Centre

5. Science Diplomacy in the 21st Century

11. Climate Change as a Threat Multiplier 
SHERRI GOODMAN, Senior Fellow, Wilson Center
CHRISTINE GREENE, Cultural Ambassador, Pacific Rising 
GREG STONE, EVP & Chief Scientist for Oceans, Conservation International

6. Three Dimensions of Science Diplomacy

12. Putting Science Diplomacy in Practice 
ROMAN MACAYA, Costa Rican Ambassador to the U.S. 

 

COURSE MODULES

1. INTRODUCTION

 

Learn how this course will help you understand the interaction of science and diplomacy in practice. By the end, you'll recognize the roles of scientists, diplomats, and other societal actors. You'll also come to realize that science diplomacy is more than the sum of its parts.

 

 

 2. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN SCIENCE AND DIPLOMACY

 

Why is science important for diplomacy? Learn about how and why the Antarctic Treaty is an excellent example. 

EXAMPLES OF SCIENCE DIPLOMACY
The Antarctic Treaty, 1959

​RESOURCES

 

 

 3. OVERCOMING PRECONCEPTIONS

 

What do we mean when we say 'diplomacy'? Science is a process for pursuing answers, while diplomacy is a process for for dialogue and cooperation between countries and citizens. By integrating the two, we can face challenges and take opportunities to advance humanity. 

KEY TERMS
State actor: An individual or institution that acts on behalf of a government and is authorized to make decisions and communicate with other governments in an official capacity. In international relations, these are known as "traditional diplomats" and include foreign ministers as well as ambassadors and diplomats.
Non-state actor: An individual or organization that has significant political influence but is not allied to any particular government. These include private citizens, NGOs, universities, civil society groups, and private companies.

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4. A BRIEF HISTORY OF SCIENCE DIPLOMACY

 

The term 'science diplomacy' is relatively new. It's been used for less than a decade. However, diplomacy and science have intertwined throughout the ages.

EXAMPLES OF SCIENCE DIPLOMACY
The Apollo-Soyuz Mission, 1975 (“Handshake in space”)

RESOURCES

 

 

5. SCIENCE DIPLOMACY IN THE 21st CENTURY

 

How are science and diplomacy changing in the modern world? 

EXAMPLES OF SCIENCE DIPLOMACY
The International Space Station
Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA)

RESOURCES

 

6. THREE DIMENSIONS OF SCIENCE DIPLOMACY 

 

Learn about the three-part framework for science diplomacy: 

  • Diplomacy for science
  • Science for Diplomacy
  • Science in Diplomacy
 

 

 7. DIPLOMACY FOR SCIENCE

 

KEY TERMS
Diplomacy for Science: Diplomacy that facilitates international cooperation in order to advance scientific goals. This role often refers to flagship international projects in which nations come together to collaborate on high-cost, high-risk scientific projects that otherwise could not be conducted. But it also refers to the set of policies, such as those governing international travel, visas, and permit acquisition, that facilitate international science cooperation.

EXAMPLES OF SCIENCE DIPLOMACY
CERN & the Large Hadron Collider
Square Kilometer Array (SKA)
SESAME

RESOURCES

 

8. SCIENCE FOR DIPLOMACY

 

KEY TERMS
Science for Diplomacy: Scientific cooperation can improve international relations. It draws on the universal language of science to engage countries, reinforce relationships, and ease tensions in situations of political strain.
Soft power: Global influence accrued when non-state, culturally attractive factors may predispose people to sympathize with a foreign culture based on affinity for its products and values. It’s also known as “hearts and minds” diplomacy.

EXAMPLES OF SCIENCE DIPLOMACY
East German scientists at CERN
International Space Station
AAAS partnership with the Cuban Academy of Sciences

RESOURCES

 

 

9. SCIENCE IN DIPLOMACY

 

KEY TERMS
Science in Diplomacy: Science can inform diplomatic decisions or agreements. For example, a scientific study can set out the relevant evidence to help solve a disagreement between two countries, or can provide benchmarks by which international treaties are regulated.
Transboundary Resources: Physical and/or biological resources that cross national boundaries. These can include migratory wildlife and water.

EXAMPLES OF SCIENCE DIPLOMACY

The Iran Nuclear Deal, 2015
The Paris Agreement on Climate Change, 2015

United Nations Fish Stocks Review, 2010

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 10. TRANSBOUNDARY RESOURCES AND SHARED SPACES 

 

Explore how science diplomacy is crucial in territories and spaces that lie outside of any nation. 

KEY TERMS
Global Commons: Unowned, supranational resources or domains. These include the high seas, outer space, the atmosphere, and Antarctica.
Shared Spaces: Contiguous areas that fall under the jurisdiction of two or more nations.
RecallTransboundary Resources: Physical and/or biological resources that cross national boundaries. These can include wildlife and water.

RESOURCES

 

 

11. CLIMATE CHANGE AS A THREAT MULTIPLIER
 

KEY TERMS
Threat Multiplier: A challenge or situation that has the potential to exacerbate other problems that may already be present.

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